Political Economy of African Wars Series

Weapons of Mass Corruption: How corruption in South Sudan’s military undermines the world’s newest country

“Weapons of Mass Corruption” is the fifth in a series of in-depth, field research-driven reports on the dynamics of profit and power fueling war in the Horn, East and Central Africa. Violent kleptocracies dominate the political landscape of this region, leading to protracted conflicts marked by the commission of mass atrocities by state and non-state actors. Enough's Political Economy of African Wars series will focus on the key players in these conflicts, their motivations, how they benefit from the evolving war economies, and what policies might be most effective in changing the calculations of those orchestrating the violence–including both incentives and pressures for peace.

Weapons of Mass Corruption

Khartoum’s Economic Achilles’ Heel: The intersection of war, profit, and greed

Sudan’s increasingly urgent economic crisis, which has recently grown more acute because of financial isolation related in part to tighter sanctions enforcement for Iran, has become the Sudanese regime’s greatest vulnerability. This economic vulnerability has caused sanctions relief to replace debt relief as the regime’s primary preoccupation, giving the U.S. government powerful leverage to support an inclusive peace deal in Sudan that leads to a transition to democracy. 

Deadly Enterprise: Dismantling South Sudan's War Economy and Countering Potential Spoilers

Political Economy of African Wars Series

“Deadly Enterprise” is the third in a series of in-depth, field research-driven reports on the dynamics of profit and power fueling war in the Horn, East and Central Africa. Violent kleptocracies dominate the political landscape of this region, leading to protracted conflicts marked by the commission of mass atrocities by state and non-state actors. Enough's Political Economy of African Wars series will focus on the key players in these conflicts, their motivations, how they benefit from the evolving war economies, and what policies might be most effective in changing the calculations of those orchestrating the violence–including both incentives and pressures for peace.

Deadly Enterprise

New Report - Warlord Business: CAR’s Violent Armed Groups and their Criminal Operations for Profit and Power

In a new Enough Project report released today, author Kasper Agger examines how the two main armed groups in the Central African Republic (CAR) and their multiple factions make millions of dollars in profits from illicit activities, such as the illicit sale of natural resources, taxation, extortion and the strategic use of killings and violence.  Read More »

Warlord Business: CAR’s Violent Armed Groups and their Criminal Operations for Profit and Power

Political Economy of African Wars Series

“Warlord Business” is the second in a new series of in-depth, field research-driven reports on the dynamics of profit and power fueling war in the Horn, East and Central Africa. Violent kleptocracies dominate the political landscape of this region, leading to protracted conflicts marked by the commission of mass atrocities by state and non-state actors. Enough's Political Economy of African Wars series will focus on the key players in these conflicts, their motivations, how they benefit from the evolving war economies, and what policies might be most effective in changing the calculations of those orchestrating the violence–including both incentives and pressures for peace.

Warlord Business

New Report: Neighborhood Watch: Mobilizing Regional Action for Peace in South Sudan

Neighborhood Watch

In South Sudan, efforts to broker peace are not succeeding. A new Enough Project report describes the competing political and economic interests of South Sudan’s neighbors that have so far undermined regional willingness to take action against the warring parties and what the U.S. can do to bring about a negotiated settlement to the conflict.  Read More »

Neighborhood Watch: Mobilizing Regional Action for Peace in South Sudan

Political Economy of African Wars Series

"Neighborhood Watch: Mobilizing Regional Action for Peace in South Sudan" is the first in the Enough Project's new series of in-depth, field research-driven reports on the dynamics of profit and power fueling war in the Horn, East and Central Africa. Violent kleptocracies dominate the political landscape of this region, leading to protracted conflicts marked by the commission of mass atrocities by state and non-state actors. Enough's Political Economy of African Wars series will focus on the key players in these conflicts, their motivations, how they benefit from the evolving war economies, and what policies might be most effective in changing the calculations of those orchestrating the violence–including both incentives and pressures for peace.

Neighborhood Watch
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